À mort l’artiste

Several LPs were used for this project. We printed on them a coded text in Morse. This text is based on the manifesto-text: “Death to the artist,” available here.

The challenge of this project lies in the difference between the visual and the signifier. The code comes totally in contrast to the idea of an intelligible content and something graspable. Even if Morse code is something fairly well known and easy to decipher it is, in reality, not so easy to understand it. First, because we have lost its knowledge and its use (previously employed in the military and telecommunication telegram), then because today we have developed and integrated new communication technologies, more complex and user-friendly.

À mort l'artiste

Certainly, the Morse code became obsolete and almost exclusively used nowadays by Scouts or amateur radio, which brings it on a reduced scale use. These printed LPs embody several dimensions, issuing a spontaneous sense, incomprehensible, present such a parasite embedded in a well of everyday consumer. The installation encourages people willing to listen to the disc, change, or even to take home or go listen to other places. The other idea of ​​this piece is on the innocence of anonymity. Most discs are issued from popular music, variety and this causes a real contrast to the inserted text. “Death to the artist! “Is a form of punk manifesto that calls into question the position of the contemporary artist. The author situates the history of the status and stature of this officilialisation and claims the eradication of all belonging to the artist’s position.

À mort l'artiste

According to the text-manifesto, the artist would be an instrumentalization of the bourgeois and elitist systems and surely more an actor against the dominant power. It even pushes its pitch by denouncing the majority of artists as fully aware of their compromises to the benefit of political and social authorities. the artist would lose its ability to disrupt the world and  its power to offer a critical vision. We do not think personal that the artist can change the world, however, we do think it still has a power – even if reduced – to assign and move consciences. The artist might be outside the mainstream and alienating circuits and introduce his work insidiously, almost clandestine, and directly connected to daily life. With this project, we try to get away from the spectacular, from the impressive to infiltrate the domestic field. Thus a job actually becomes policy.

À mort l'artiste